Secret Places, Country Lanes

Sky Puddles on a remote country lane on the north side of Mt. Pisgah where I had never gone before.

 

Sky Puddles: “What does it mean to photograph with passion?”

Once upon a May morning, I was photo walking along the Coast Fork of the Willamette where it flows around to create the boundary of Mt. Pisgah Arboretum here in Eugene, Oregon. I was surrounded by the lush fairyland of waist high blue larkspur and camas folded into the rich green grass starred with buttercups and wild Nootka roses.

Under the riparian trees of the Mt. Pisgah Arboretum, larkspur grows as high as your waist.
Under the riparian trees of the Mt. Pisgah Arboretum, larkspur grows as high as your waist.

I was clicking away taking standard shots I’d taken every spring for decades.

I felt a little depressed by what seemed to be impossible—to see all this with new eyes.

I sat down on a bench by the river and asked myself,

“What does it mean to photograph with passion?”

I didn’t exactly know the answer, but I let the question seep into me. Then I got up and started to really look through the viewfinder for something that satisfied some richness I’d been longing for.

I put my camera in the “pop art” setting that I’d heard others scorn. That bumped the colors of the flowers up into the stratosphere. Then I stopped down the exposure until backgrounds blurred to interlocked circles of green or blurred to paintbrush swatches of barn door red and sky blue.

A half blown Nootka Rose in an afternoon meadow by the river.
A half blown Nootka Rose in an afternoon meadow by the river.

When I could, I positioned flowers against dark shadows, so they would glow with jewel tone intensity on the velvety black backdrop.

Meadow Rue on the verge of opening to its first day in this new world.
Meadow Rue on the verge of opening to its first day in this new world.

At the pond, the lily flowers were radiant little suns about to open against maroon lily pads floating on dark water.

Lilies on the Water Meadow Pond
Lilies on the Water Meadow Pond
Orange lilies on maroon leaves floating over and sheltering a watery world below.
Orange lilies on maroon leaves floating over and sheltering a watery world below.

Suddenly, within an hour of asking the question, I had a method, an approach I could take to deepen my vision of a passionate world.

It was Laura Valenti, my photography instructor for “Light Atlas,” who told me, “Sandy, face it: at heart you’re a landscape photographer.”

So how to bring something new, that “what else” factor to the everyday landscapes of my little snow globe of a world?

I was out yesterday with that question, and as is my habit, I made a little nature video like a journal entry for the day—these grew out of the Gratitude Walks in another of Laura’s classes. This one is “Secret Places, Country Lanes.”

For today, I select this image as the one that seems most to suggest worlds within worlds.

Sky Puddles on a remote country lane on the north side of Mt. Pisgah where I had never gone before.
Sky Puddles on a remote country lane on the north side of Mt. Pisgah where I had never gone before.

Magical Seeing

Storm Cell

Magical Seeing

When I was a very young girl, I was immersed in a magical, light-drenched natural world. I lived by the wild and undammed Wenatchee River. The mountain range called The Enchantments floated above my childhood home like an Avalon in the sky, seeming to be untethered to my little earth. The snow-covered mountains soared high and free above me and my family, guardian of all I was, protector of all I would become.

The Enchantments and Colchuck Lake.
The Enchantments and Colchuck Lake. I’m not sure exactly who took this photograph–probably my dad, but maybe one of his friends or a member of his climbing club.

My dad photographed all this high country wilderness–macro, micro, telephoto and wide-angled lens and eyes.

My dad, Warren Brown, circa 194, with his Leica.
My dad, Warren Brown, circa 1974, with his Leica.

My sister became a watercolor painter of trees and skies with a fine brush for the details of the snowy owl, the raven, the vultures and the eagles.

My sister Cheryl Long, became a painter; this is her Snowy Owl.
My sister Cheryl R. Long, became a painter; this is her Snowy Owl.

We were a family caught up in a shimmering net of the beauty of place, and each in his or her own way struggled to live up to the emotional privilege of being somehow allowed to exist there for so many years in the wide arm of the river, under the great wing of The Enchantments.

We lived in a dreamlike world...Circa 1967. Left to right: my sister Cheryl, brother Lisle, me, our dad, Warren, sister Toren.
We lived in a dreamlike world…Circa 1967. Left to right: my sister Cheryl, brother Lisle, me, our dad, Warren, sister Toren.

I found my own way into the heart of this enchanted world through poetry and story and was lucky enough to stumble upon a career that sustained me in those passions. It was through poetry I first learned the power of what my photo teacher Laura Valenti calls, “Magical Seeing.”

Like poets, photographers immersed in exploration of soul must consider the contrasts between the elusive light and a rich and suggestive dark. In both word and image, poets and photographers like me struggle to capture the haunting, evocative mood, that sense of timelessness and nostalgia.

Memory, dream, reflections...
Memory, dream, reflections…

I like that these years I live in now are called my “golden years.” I can look back at that young girl and see that she spent her entire life in pursuit of this magical seeing. She understood with her heart what I can now not only feel but explain: that we live mythic lives thrumming with the vitality of light, and, as Valenti puts it, “Rich with meaning and mythology and magic.”

Valenti’s challenge to me is the one I have always put to myself, “What can I do to express ever more profoundly a magical way of seeing and being in my world?”

I still live in a natural world so explosive with beauty and detail that I could weep with despair over my inability to photograph it in a new and “more magical” way.

Cow Parsnip Diva
Every once in a while, numinous figures appear from the other side to guide me and reassure me I’m on the right track. In this moment, it was The Cow Parsnip Diva who brought the good news.

I read a book once on designing a Romantic garden. The primary tip my husband and I implemented in our garden is the concept of using arches to create receding vistas that open up to little rooms in the garden. Even a small lot like ours became extraordinary when we thought through adding these layers, these glimpsed views into other little secret gardens within the garden.

On an ordinary walk from my house, I can look through the surprising doorway into the deep reflective green of Delta Pond.
On an ordinary walk from my house, I can look through the surprising doorway into the deep reflective green of Delta Pond.

Earlier this week, I was out specifically shooting for “Secret Places,” and now I add this memory about building a garden to Valenti’s thoughts on seeing opportunities to photograph layers–through archways, under trees into remote and beckoning meadows, through the scrim of a rain cell moving fast across a sunlit valley.

From high up on the shoulder of Spencer Butte, I photographed this storm cell sweeping across the sunlit valley before. I used my iPhone 7+ for this shot.
From high up on the shoulder of Spencer Butte, I photographed this storm cell sweeping across the sunlit valley before. I used my iPhone 7+ for this shot.

“Tell me,” asks poet Mary Oliver, “what are you going to do with your one wild and precious life?”

I am trying to answer this question as best I can: I’m trying to give back the magic to the world it has given to me.

The Beautyway

Sandy sitting on the steps of an old cabin in Utah
A day doesn’t go by but I sit on the stoop of my hacienda and contemplate the many visual gifts of those who have either gone before me or who walk The Beautyway path of photography and art with me.

As an assignment in Laura Valenti’s class “Meditations on Gratitude,” we were asked to find some way to celebrate or honor our visual mentors–those who have inspired and informed our own efforts at photography.

I know Laura said we didn’t have to go all-out, but too late! All of yesterday got swallowed up (creatively, just the way I like to get swept away by a challenge) as well as a couple hours this morning. I easily have eight hours in this little four minute video–there was just so much to think about, process, and, of course, my original file was 10-15 minutes, so the agonizing editing!

I originally included my husband and my artist sister, but then I started to think about large family politics and reluctantly deleted them. Same with Galen Rowell and Art Wolfe and Ansel Adams and Andrew Wyeth–too many white guys, thanks to my father’s influence and generation. Paul Klee, Kandinsky, Caravaggio, Vermeer, Goya…the list goes on thanks to a lifetime self-education in the arts…and the historical lack of women.

However, many years ago, there was a three-nation traveling exhibit of Georgia O’Keeffe, Emily Carr, and Frida Kahlo, and that single day in the museum shaped my thinking and my vision for the decades to come. I have studied all three intensively and journeyed to the wellsprings of their visual inspiration to find my own.

More recently, thanks to an inspirational video Laura posted, I am being inspired by Jay Maisel not to do something I’m not already doing, but to do it more intentionally.

Jay Maisel was asked what two words would make a person a better photographer, and he said, “Be open. Be open to what is happening around you…”

This is my third class with Laura, and her visual aesthetic never ceases to astonish me because it is so different from my own; yet, it is beautiful and evocative, so I have opened my visual range to include images with that unique “Valenti effect.”

I am grateful to all the great artists, including the ones right here in my own home, who have informed and continue to educate my eye to what is most beautiful in this world.

 

Who are YOUR visual mentors?

Stredit

Sandy’s Stredit

This fun project was for Vimeo’s Weekend Challenge. The concept was to edit together in chronological order the last, say, hundred or so of the videos on your Camera Roll.

The neologistic “stredit” means “straight edit.”

My “recent additions” of videos to my camera roll started in the middle of our Spring Break trip to Monterrey Bay and Aquarium then went to an art installation then up the McKenzie River with Debra Stein to Tamolitch Pool.

Somewhere in there is a day trip to Alsea Falls and the surf park at Yachats (Oregon Coast). Then some shots around my studio of dolls and poems finishing with some Maya Brolutti fire dancing at the beach and rain in the trees.

That’s pretty much my life in two minutes!

 

Slowing Time

Anyone who know me knows I am a wandering spirit. I am not that stay-at-home-and-garden person. After I finish my daily work at the computer or in the classroom, almost every day I pick up my camera, put on my boots and just GO. I am never happier than when I have disappeared into the landscape (all those who wander are not lost!).

Last week, I dashed off to nearby Fall Creek. It was the end of the day during a time when the days are slowly growing longer. At sunset I was at a place called Fisherman’s Bend, where I had never stopped before. Red rock, rushing water pooling green, swirling and catching the low light–all these pulled me into that forever place for just a half hour, but that’s all I need to find my place on the planet once more, just for today.

I experimented with the mobile device app called Stellar to create a little slideshow of the afternoon’s mini-adventure. I’m not sure I’m thrilled with the way it looks on the web–do you have an opinion?

On the iPad, the entire screen is filled, which looks great. On the web, it appears to me as small, and I don’t see a way to expand it–although cleverer eyes than mind might spot a way and be kind enough to let me know. But I DO like the mini-portfolio concept offered by Stellar.